in

KWS supplies water to wild animals in Lamu

On Wednesday, the organisation started massive water tracking to rescue thousands of wild animals facing drought.

The KWS also started rescue operations for hundreds of hippos and buffaloes stuck in mud in lakes, dams and rivers that are drying up as a result of the drought.

The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) is supplying water to wild animals in Lamu following ravaging drought.

It is estimated that more than 30 hippos and hundreds of buffaloes, antelopes and gazelles have already died in Lamu due to the drought after getting stuck in mud.

The KWS said more than 100 hippos and buffaloes are stuck at various water points including Lake Kenyatta in Mpeketoni, Mkunumbi Dam and Lake Chomo in Hindi.

Lamu County KWS Senior Warden Jacob Orale said they were working round the clock to ensure animals stuck in mud are rescued alive.

He said the many water sources that have dried up and turned muddy due to the drought have become dangerous to wildlife.

W+2 KWS supplies water to wild animals in Lamu

A Kenya Wildlife Service bowser waters Lake Chomo in Hindi, Lamu West on March 1, 2017 to keep 23 hippos hydrated after they had got stuck in mud. PHOTO | KALUME KAZUNGU | NATION MEDIA GROUP

At Lake Kenyatta, which is almost drying up, at least 60 hippos are stuck at muddy puddles. Some other 50 other are also stuck at Mkunumbi Dam, just 10 km from the lake.

The hippos are said to have migrated to the dam from Lake Kenyatta in search of water after the Mpeketoni Lake had dried up.

The situation is the same at Lake Chomo where at least 23 hippos and their young ones are stuck in mud, with an unknown number having already perished.

“We have already begun an exercise to remove wildlife stuck in mud across the county to reduce further deaths. We are also carrying out intense water tracking which simply means spraying and filling up water points in the various areas including lakes and dams where the hippos are stuck to keep them hydrated. We believe the water tracking will also loosen the consistency of the mud to enable the animals walk freely out of the mud. We want to save the animals from perishing due to the drought,” Mr Orale said.

W3 KWS supplies water to wild animals in Lamu

A Kenya Wildlife Service bowser waters Lake Chomo in Hindi, Lamu West on March 1, 2017 to keep 23 hippos hydrated after they had got stuck in mud. PHOTO | KALUME KAZUNGU | NATION MEDIA GROUP

He said due to the drought, many of the wildlife had fled their habitats and moved closer to human residences in search of food and water.

“We have to save at least some of these animals because at the end of the day, if their numbers dwindle, it’s also risky to the balance of the ecosystem and will definitely not do our tourism industry any good,” Mr Orale said.

He said the water tracking will reduce or cut short trips made by wildlife to human habitats in search of water and harming people.

Last week, Lamu KWS officials expressed fear of massive wildlife deaths as the animals were forced to resort to drinking highly concentrated saline ocean water after all fresh water had points dried up.

“We believe the water tracking exercise will reduce encounters between humans and wildlife to some extent and will also reduce resultant deaths and injuries. But majorly we are doing this to keep the wildlife alive hopefully until the drought ends,” Mr Orale said.

Boost for Kanu as several aspirants in Trans Nzoia defect

Diani beach ranked among top 25 in Africa