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Why Kalonzo Musyoka’s name is on many lips

That Nasa opted to go the boardroom way in choosing its presidential flagbearer is an indicator that the name of Wiper leader Kalonzo Musyoka may be on the lips of many.

Using the popular or delegates system was almost certainly bound to produce another candidate.

By deciding to identify a flagbearer through negotiations rather than the ballot, opposition operatives were running away from a possible Raila verdict.

In there lies the hint that the coalition might be keener in unveiling, not just a popular candidate, but one who has realistic chances of delivering victory against President Kenyatta.

Mr Musyoka has repeatedly said the opposition must try a fresh candidate.

CHASING TICKET

Of the three men chasing the ticket, the Wiper leader is almost assured of occupying either the presidential or running mate position.

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As the only politician in Nasa from eastern Kenya, most presidential formulations being touted by the opposition revolve around the man from Tseikuru, Kitui County.

Every ticket being deemed appropriate features Mr Musyoka, either as presidential candidate or running mate.

BEST PICK

A host of other factors work in favour of Mr Musyoka as Nasa’s best pick, including his long work experience, personal appeal and global connections.

Former Agriculture minister Kipruto arap Kirwa says Mr Musyoka has been around longer in elective politics than the other Nasa presidential hopefuls, having first entered parliament in 1985.

Over the decades, he has expanded his political space and control over regions outside Ukambani.

And, much as opinion polls say Mr Odinga is the most popular aspirant within Nasa, analyst and researcher Tom Wolfe says the findings are largely a reflection of a perception that Raila is the chosen one.

The import of this is that Kalonzo is similarly a popular politician who can be propelled to top of the charts.

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