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Members of Parliament plot to change quorum numbers

Members of Parliament are now plotting to legally absent themselves from the House to deal with their opponents in their constituencies.PHOTO:COURTESY

Members of Parliament are now plotting to legally absent themselves from the House to deal with their opponents in their constituencies.

Anxious that their opponents on the ground are working overtime to kick them out of the House, MPs from both sides of the divide want Parliament to come up with new temporary rules that will enable them circumvent the standing orders that sets quorum at 50 members.

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The MPs want House proceedings to begin even with less than 50 members, except in cases where a question on Bills has to be voted on.

“You need to guide us that at the beginning of the House, the quorum might not be necessary. This is a question we need to decide on. As we approach the August 7 elections, this bell will ring and ring and ring and ring and we will be waiting for people who are kilometres away campaigning for nomination,” said Leader of Majority Aden Duale (Garissa Town) as he called for a reconsideration of the standing orders.

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He was supported by Deputy Minority Leader Jakoyo Midiwo (Gem) who captured the anxiety most members are feeling, having to attend the House, as their opponents cause havoc in their backyards.

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Deputy Minority Whip Chris Wamalwa (Kiminini) said the whips have a difficult time looking for members “including inside the kitchen’.

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Should Speaker Justin Muturi agree to the MPs’ request to help them circumvent the rules, it means that soon, lawmakers might be debating in near empty chambers as most members retreat to the constituencies for campaigns.

 

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