KPMG report on dead voters wrong, says Kidero

Nairobi Governor Evans Kidero has poked holes in the KPMG report that revealed there are 92,272 dead voters in the IEBC register saying the data was inaccurate.

Dr Kidero, who spoke in Regina Caeli Catholic Church in Karen on Sunday, claimed on average, over 200 people die in Nairobi daily making it 72,000 a year translating into 360,000— since the last IEBC voter registration before 2013 elections — people hence the data from KMPG is untrue, he said.

Dr Kidero said that in Nairobi alone over 300,000 have died in five years hence surprised by the recently released numbers.

“In five years we should have probably lost 360,000 people in Nairobi alone of which 75 per cent are adult. I was surprised in the cleaning of register nationally they can only capture about 92,000,” said Dr Kidero.

The governor said that the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) should give an accurate figure. He said the audit should reveal the names of those who have died.

He urged the commission to move with speed and come up with a genuine voters list to avert the possibility of rigging the elections, especial for the seat of President.

“This time we do not want ghost voters to decide for us. I have closed Lang’ata cemetery, nobody will rise from the dead as I have given a shoot to kill to the ghost leaving the cemetery heading to the polling station,” said Dr Kidero.

Meanwhile, Raila Odinga’s wife, Ida Odinga, has warned the IEBC against allowing ghost voters in the voter register.

Mrs Odinga, who met over 2000 women leaders in Nairobi County at Kilimani Primary said that she will lead women across the country in protecting the Nasa presidential candidate’s votes.

“I am back for the last time to beg for votes for Raila and talk to my fellow women who know the pain of giving birth and children, I beg for the last time even God has heard, please vote for Raila Odinga,” she pleaded.

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