KPC seeks hi-tech kit to curb fuel theft

Lack of a high-tech system has paved the way for thugs to steal fuel from the main Kenya Pipeline Company pipes, it has emerged.

KPC general manager in charge of operations and maintenance Peter Mbugua said they were yet to acquire a lead detection system sophisticated enough to detect low level leakages.

A high-tech system can detect up to one per cent leak compared to the current kit, which is unable to detect pilferage of below 10 per cent.

The revelations came as the company initiated an environmental assessment study to establish the extent of damage along the Nakuru-Kisumu oil pipeline, which had a leak following siphoning of fuel by a rogue oil dealer.

The leak was caused by an illegal connection with a network of pipes leading to a petrol station in Koru, Muhoroni Constituency.

A home and land adjacent to the petrol station were leased to facilitate the siphoning operation.

READ: Landowner arrested as police widen KPC fuel siphoning probe

Mr Mbugua said that KPC would introduce the lead detection system in all their five lines countrywide.

In Koru, an environmental review is on to establish the extent of damage. The spillage destroyed crops, watering point and harmed animals.

“We are working hand in hand with Nema’s accredited laboratories to expedite the clean-up and ensure that no further damage is done to the environment,” KPC managing director Joe Sang said.

Police arrested a Mombasa-based businessman in connection with the siphoning.

Kwese World Cup, Uefa rights deal raises stakes for pay-TV firms

Safaricom-backed Little launches taxi services in Kisumu